Rules of Meem & Noon

Rules of Meem & Noon
Rules of Noon & Meem with Shaddah
When a reciter pronounce Noon or Meem with shaddah, he has
to pronounce Ghunnah in its most complete form during
continuous reciting (Wasl) and while stopping (Waqf), as:
{مِنَ الْجِنَّــة وَ النَّاس} { وَ لــٰكِنَّ اللهَ سَلْمَ}
{حَمَّالَةَ الحَطَبِ} { فِي الْيَمِّ وَ لاَ تَخَافِى}
Waqf: To pause or to make a stop by breaking off the breath at the end of the word
Wasl: The opposite of waqf. The joining of verses / sentences without stopping.
The Rules of Meem Sakinah
The Rules of Meem Sakinah
Idghaam ( merging of the م)
Ikhfaa (Hiding of the م)
Ith-haar (Clarity of the م)
The First Rule: Idghaam
We have already explained the linguistic and applied
definition of Idghaam on page 230 and page 231.
The Idghaam of Meem sakinah occurs when it is followed by
another Meem only with pronouncing Ghunnah in its very
complete form*, as in the example: {َلَكــُم مَّا} {مَا لَهُم مِّنَ اللهِ}
* Review the GhunnahTiming Measurments on Page
317.
The Second Rule: Ikhfaa
The linguistic definition: Hiding
Its applied definition : it is the pronunciation of the letter in a manner
between the Ith-haar and Idghaam ,without shaddah, with the ghunnah
remaining on the first letter.
(In a manner between the ith-haar and idghaam) means: that it is
similar to ithaar in one point and to idghaam in one point, but it also is
almost different from them(in other point) as well. The table on page
265 will show that.
(Without shaddah) means: separation between the sound of hidden
letter and the sound of its following letter.
(With the ghunnah remaining on the first letter) means: the ghunnah
sound accompanies the sound of the “Hidden letter ” not the second
letter , as in : {تَرْمِيهِم بِحِجَارَةٍ}
The Second Rule: Ikhfaa
Meem Sakinah is pronounced with Ikhfaa when its followed by
one letter only , which is baa’ (ب) , as in :
{ تَرْمِيهِم بِحِجَارَةٍ} { وَمَا هُم بِمُؤْمِنِينَ}
This figure illustrates the shape of lips
during ikhfaa.
The two lips are closed slightly without
pressing.
The Third Rule: Ith-har
The linguistic definition: Clarity
The applied definition: is to pronounce every letter from
its point of articulation without increasing the sound of
Ghunnah*.
The Third Rule: Ith-har
Meem Sakinah is pronounced with Ith-haar when it is
followed by all the letters except “Meem and Baa’, for
example:
{هُمْ فِيهَا} { أَمْ لَمْ تُنذِرْهُمْ لاَ يُؤْمِنُونَ}
Note
The reader should take care not to hide the Meem Sakinah
when it is followed by Waaw (و)or Faa’ (ف), as:
{أَيْدِهِمْ وَ مَا خَلْفَهُمْ وَ لاَ يُحِيطُونَ} {هُمْ فِيهَا}
(This mistake could happen)because the Meem and Waaw share
the same Makhraj(point of articulation) ; and because the
Makhraj of Meem is near to that of Faa’.
The difference between Ith-har, Ikhfaa and
Idghaam
The exit of the two
letters
The sound of the first
letter
Ith-har
The tongue is raised up
two times
Clear
Ikhfaa
The tongue is raised up
one time
Clear
Idghaam
The tongue is raised up
one time
Mixed with and Changed
into the second letter
Benefit: 1
Idghaam of the Meem in The Holy Quran is represented by
writing the Meem is without sukoon and adding shaddah (ّ), to
second letter , as in examples:
{لَكُم مَّا} {مَا لَهُم مِّنَ اللهِ}
Benefit: 2
Ikhfaa of the Meem in The Holy Quran is represented by writing
the Meem without sukoon and writing the second letter without
shaddah (ّ), as in the examples:
{تَرْمِيِم بِحجَارَةٍ} {وَ مَا هُم بِمُؤْمِنِينَ}
Benefit: 3
Ith-har of the Meem in The Holy Quran is represented by putting
the head part of letter khaa letter without dot above the Meem, as
in:
The Most Common Mistakes That Occur When
Pronouncing The Meem Sakinah

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